When You are Tempted to Overbloom + 3-minute Video Illustration

The message the world sends us is loud and clear, “you must do more, you must have more, you must be more…bloom more!” Yet, Jesus didn’t seek the kind of more-ness that the world covets. Instead, He exposed the folly in the world’s wisdom by living a small, yet infinitely significant life. | Christian Inspiration | Bible Study | Overbloom
I love it when my “everyday romantic” surprises me with flowers.

This time the blooms are a refreshing mixture of vibrant tulips.

I create a hodgepodge of floral arrangements – mason jars overflowing with inspiration – to set around my house and keep the winter blues at bay.

I am especially captivated by a single bloom resting within a petite jar on my little red writing desk.

This particular flower has blossomed so fully it entices me to reach out and caress it.

Admiration is quickly replaced with regret when my gentle touch causes two petals to drop onto the surface of my crimson workspace.

The flower blossomed to such an extent that its beauty became fragile –it overbloomed.

{Overbloom: a horticultural term describing a plant that blooms or flowers excessively, therefore undermining its strength.}  

The tulip’s fragile beauty reminds me of how often I stretch myself too far and fall to pieces.

It makes me think of my kid’s over-packed schedule which exhausts my patience and unleashes my alter ego (who likes to yell…a lot).

It rouses memories of my primal urge to produce Pinterest-worthy meals every night of the week, drowning out all rational thought pertaining to my limitations.

It prompts me to kick myself for all the stress eating which has caused my body to “bloom” beyond what my favorite jeans can comfortably contain.

Excessive blooming undermines our strength and weakens our beauty.

The message the world sends us is loud and clear, “you must do more, you must have more, you must be more…bloom more!” Yet, Jesus didn’t seek the kind of more-ness that the world covets. Instead, He exposed the folly in the world’s wisdom by living a small, yet infinitely significant life. | Christian Inspiration | Bible Study | Overbloom

The message the world sends me is loud and clear, “you must do more, you must have more, you must be more…bloom more!”

More entices me to say yes when I should say no.
More tempts me to tackle my lengthy to-do-list instead of studying my Bible.
More seduces me with its beauty and then discards me when I fail to meet its standard.

I grab one of the lonely looking petals and rub it between my fingers as I mull over this whole idea of overblooming.

My thoughts drift to the unexpected choices Jesus Christ made during his time on earth.

He didn’t seek the kind of more-ness that the world covets.

Instead, He exposed the folly in the world’s wisdom by living a small, yet infinitely significant life.

The message the world sends us is loud and clear, “you must do more, you must have more, you must be more…bloom more!” Yet, Jesus didn’t seek the kind of more-ness that the world covets. Instead, He exposed the folly in the world’s wisdom by living a small, yet infinitely significant life. | Christian Inspiration | Bible Study | Overbloom

3 Lessons about Blooming from Jesus’ Life

1. Jesus bloomed selectively.

“Yet the news about him spread all the more, so that crowds of people came to hear him and to be healed of their sicknesses. But Jesus often withdrew to lonely places and prayed.” Luke 5:15-16 NIV

It must have been challenging for one capable of doing so much to regularly withdraw from the demands of the world.

But that’s exactly what Jesus did.

Because Jesus’ priority was to do the will of the Father, He wasn’t enticed when the world shouted, “it’s not enough…bloom more!”

2. Jesus focused on roots rather than blossoms.

“The Son can do nothing by himself; he can do only what he sees his Father doing, because whatever the Father does the Son also does.” John 5:19 NIV

Although Jesus produced many beautiful blossoms during his life and ministry, they were never his focus.

His roots reached deeply into the truth of the Scripture and his life was sustained by the promises of the Father.

Jesus prioritized seeking nourishment from the Father over producing an abundance of blossoms to capture the attention of men.

3. Jesus understood that the seed must die before the flower can bloom.

“The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” Matthew 20:28 NIV

Everyone assumed that Jesus would set up an earthly kingdom, yet what he did was so much greater.

He sacrificed himself for the glory of God and the good of all mankind.

Jesus was the seed that died so that we could have life –so that we could bloom for His glory!

Next time our hearts yearn for the more-ness of the world, let’s remember that fragile overbloomed tulip and choose to follow the Jesus’ example instead.

The message the world sends us is loud and clear, “you must do more, you must have more, you must be more…bloom more!” Yet, Jesus didn’t seek the kind of more-ness that the world covets. Instead, He exposed the folly in the world’s wisdom by living a small, yet infinitely significant life. | Christian Inspiration | Bible Study | Christian | Encouragement | Lessons | Women Inspired | Faith | Tips | Ideas

How to Follow Jesus’ Example

Are you living a life that is rooted in God’s word or are you dipping your rootless stem into the broken vase of this world?

2 Corinithians 2:7 says, “So then, just as you received Christ Jesus as Lord, continue to live your lives in him, rooted and built up in him, strengthened in the faith as you were taught, and overflowing with thankfulness.”

Roots provide nourishment to extend the life of the blossom.
Roots provide stability to withstand the storms of this life.
Roots provide hope for a better future.

The world system offers us a kind of beauty that is fragile, fleeting, fickle.

God offers us a kind of beauty that is resilient, redeemed, resplendent.

Roots don’t change our circumstance; they give us the strength to thrive in spite of our circumstance.

Closing Challenge & Conversation Starter

In closing, I challenge you to follow Jesus example and…

Bloom selectively.
Grow deep roots.
Serve God alone.

Then you won’t be enticed when the world shouts, “it’s not enough…bloom more!”

What are some practical things we can do to shift our focus off of producing beautiful blossoms and onto growing deep roots? I’d love to chat about it with you in the comments…

This article has been shared at many of my favorite Faith & Family Linkups.

Sarah Koontz

About Sarah Koontz

  Sarah Koontz invites Christians of all ages to explore the beauty of God’s design. She is a passionate storyteller who enjoys using illustrations to communicate deep spiritual truths. Sarah lives on 13-acres in South Dakota with her husband, two daughters and a rowdy flock of 30 chickens. She revels in their simple, uncluttered life. Follow Sarah on FacebookInstagram, Twitter and Pinterest. Read Sarah's full Bio Here.

29 thoughts on “When You are Tempted to Overbloom + 3-minute Video Illustration

  1. Love the imagery with the overbloomed tulip. I think for me, working on one task at a time and staying focused in my day instead of letting comparison for others or idle time on social media distract me from my purpose helps me to not overbloom.

    1. Comparison cripples, and I’m afraid that multi-tasking isn’t much better. I’m always trying to accomplish so much, and I always believe I can do more than I really can. You are so right, these two things tempt us to overbloom.

  2. Wow, Sarah. So much truth and beauty in this post. There was a time earlier this winter where I was really struggling with wanting to tackle my to-do list versus studying my Bible … I know that is one of the reasons why the last few months have been so hard (other than surgery, winter and work stress). Thanks for the reminder that Jesus didn’t focus on blooms … He focused on roots. So, so good. Love you, sweet sister.

    1. It is amazing how easily we slip into overblooming, isn’t it Lauren? I think we simply must remind ourselves that deep roots always produce the best blossoms.

  3. This post reminds me of some simple advice I received recently: You can only do so much in one day. I know, really simple, but for me it was perfectly timed. Overblooming/overworking in the name of service isn’t pretty when we’re worn out. Thanks for writing! Visiting from #mommymoments

    1. Angela, I so get this! Whenever I have a free day, I write up a to-do list with 3 days worth of stuff and I end the day defeated (even though I’m sure I got a lot done). Our expectations really do hold us captive and force us to overbloom. This is such wise counsel!

  4. Thank you for this encouragement to live a more purposeful life, Sarah. Jesus IS our prime example, isn’t he? I want to be led by God, not pushed by the world!

  5. Hey Sarah,

    Sometimes there just aren’t words.

    An analogy that sometimes helps me is that of an airplane. In the event of an emergency put your oxygen mask on yourself first, then subsequently help other people. Not to be selfish but I’m of no use to anyone if I don’t take the time to be filled with breath & life. If I drop I’m of no good to anyone!

  6. I love this insight, Sarah. How true that we need to be more concerned to be rooted in Jesus. I sometimes condemn myself that I don’t bloom more and brighter for others. I compare myself too much to others and start feeling not enough. I have to remember that it’s not God saying, “Do more!” Thank you for this timely encouragement! Love and hugs!

    1. We are often too hard on ourselves, aren’t we Trudy? Comparison is a trap I fall into when I’m not careful. We must simply remind ourselves that God only created one of us, and comparison is futile, because we are a beautifully unique possession of the King!

  7. Have I ever felt poured out so much that I, well not sure I looked like I was blooming in those moments! What a beautiful illustration of cut flowers and rooted flowers. You have a beautiful site, Sarah, and an authentic message. So happy to be visiting you today friend!

    1. Hi Lisa, thank you for stopping by and for your kind words. This illustration deeply impacted me, and I am grateful to have a space to share what God is teaching me.

  8. This is good stuff! Such a perfect message for society today and for me personally. I’m working on nourishing my roots! Blessings!

    1. Society does often shout at us, telling us we need to do more. It’s nice to have the example of Jesus to compare our lives with, and to comfort us when we feel like we aren’t doing enough. He didn’t do it all, He simply did what the father asked.

  9. What a great analogy Sarah! Perfect message for so many of us. I’m so guilty of trying to multi task all the time. My kids used to tell everyone I was good at it but in all honesty I wasn’t. Feels like the jack of all trades master of none saying. Always love your words friends!

    1. Ahh, the curse of multi-tasking. I am so trying to break my own habit of taking on too much at once, and never finishing anything, and ending the day worn and stressed and feeling like a failure. It’s good to learn to do one thing at a time, and to take time to celebrate the small achievements of life.

  10. Sarah- I loved this post! Overbloom here quite a bit. I need to put down more intentional roots and free up my schedule more!
    Choice is the key, isn’t it?

    1. I hope this illustration sticks with you as it has me, Julie. It’s such a temptation to focus on blossoms rather than roots, but in the end it affects our productivity (especially on a spiritual level). We must choose less when we are tempted to strive for more.

  11. I especially appreciate the point of focusing on roots instead of on flowers. We want to put all our effort into the things others see and praise, but the unseen work of quietly laying down roots into Truth is the thing that will last.

  12. As a Type A personality this devotion hits me between the eyes. It’s so hard not to see what isn’t done than to focus on Him when it gets too busy. Thanks for the great reminder. This line was the most impactful to me:
    “Excessive blooming undermines our strength and weakens our beauty.”
    SOOOOO true! In sooooo many ways.
    Praying a steady flow of anointing for you to write.
    ~Sherry Stahl
    xoxo

  13. I write a little blog and so often I get impatient. I want to see results aka bloom. I’ve been praying a lot about being ok with just seeking God’s approval – that even if no one reads my blog, all that matters is if I am obedient to Him. Thank you for this poignant reminder that God sees the roots just as much as the blooms and they are just as beautiful to Him.

    1. Karin, I struggled with this same thing my first year blogging. Finally, I tired of pushing aginst the brick wall and refocused my energy on the things I could control (being wise with my time, working my plan, learning from others). I also started writing with one single reader in mind. Knowing that at least 1 person would be encouraged by my writing, trusting that to be true, helped me to stick with it and now I’m slowing beginning to see the fruits of my labor. Lots and lots of roots leads to beautiful blossoms, never forget that growing roots takes time and care. God bless your blogging adventures.

  14. Hi Sarah! Thanks for sharing this excellent reminder! I like how you said “Roots don’t change our circumstance; they give us the strength to thrive in spite of our circumstance.” I often fixate on circumstances rather than the deeper roots I’m able to grow because of those circumstances! Your neighbor at #livefreethursday

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